Finding the Joy

2016-10-28 16.11.19
It’s been awhile since I posted anything. I found that it was better for me to sit among my flowers drinking green tea rather than sitting in front of a computer blogging or tweeting. In short, I stopped writing to focus on living. I may have been focusing on living, but my past crept up on me resulting in this post.

Problem with constant self-care and the necessary daily autoimmune paleo cooking required to regain health (e-stim of anterior tibs and hamstrings, meditation, affirmations, weights, Wii balance exercises, strength exercises, bone broth etc) is that one ends up feeling that “this is all I do”, “this is all I am”. It became a joke around my house. If I was miffed or bored, I’d just announce, “I guess I’ll just go cook some broccoli!” The problem was, it wasn’t a joke, and by repeating that to myself I wasn’t doing myself any favors. In fact, I was harming myself and my already fragile self-esteem.
It became apparent when a close friend asked what I did for ‘joy” in my life, and I couldn’t answer the question. I had a serious problem.
I had lost any joy in my life somewhere between the unexpected loss of an extremely close family member in January and my increasingly longer to-do list. read more

Is your green tea safe?

Another lovely post about The profound health benefits of green tea from its high anti-oxidant level, lowering mortality rates, lowering cancer risks, and boosting immunity.

This is all well and good, but it is necessary to remember that there is a huge difference between types of green tea. The green tea from China has actually been shown to be toxic in some cases. It is always best to stick with either Japanese green tea or at least an organic green tea to insure purity.

Here’s a great summary from a supplier of Japanese green tea we use, Hibiki-An: Green Tea for Health read more

Tecfidera

BG-12 (Tecfidera)
I keep track of what’s on the horizon as far as MS research is concerned. Given it takes many years for products to come to fruition with all the studies that need to be done in order to be considered for FDA approval, something that looks good in the beginning can fall flat somewhere along the route. BG-12, now known as Tecfidera, had my interest in its infancy as a drug.

I was so impressed with the data that it was the one drug I had even considered a substitute therapy—to finally leave Betaseron and the injections behind seemed a real possibility. read more

low-dose naltrexone (LDN)

Low-dose Naltrexone, better known as LDN, is a recent addition to the repertoire of autoimmune patients. The claim is that it “can normalize the immune system”. There is an extensive page of information found here which catalogs the list of diseases for which it has been useful.

I wanted to know exactly how it works, but it turns out that the best we can do is know “how it is BELIEVED to work”.

In general, in people with diseases that are partially or largely triggered by a deficiency of endorphins (including cancer and autoimmune diseases), or are accelerated by a deficiency of endorphins (such as HIV/AIDS), restoration of the body’s normal production of endorphins is the major therapeutic action of LDN. read more

gut results

The results of the GI Effects Microbial Ecology Profile – Stool which I submitted on September 4th, 2014, were all I could have asked for. My usage of Allimed has rid me of three of my gut squatters: clostridia, campylobacter, and a parasite. I had waited a few weeks to have Genova run this particular Stool panel because they had updated their tests such that we’d receive even more glorious information about my poo. That expanded information yielded a much-needed extra result–I also carry another bug: Proteus. Not only did they find out this tidbit, but they also told me what my Proteus is sensitive to and, hence, what to treat it with. Seems my Proteus is sensitive to Oregano Oil and penicillin antibiotics don’t bother it at all. This tells me that the likelihood I’ve been carrying this particular bug for awhile is very high given my life has been nothing if not penicillin-filled. read more

buzzwords

As humans, you’ve got to admit that we are easily trained to behave in a certain manner. It’s not surprising that BigFood has learned that our brains respond to buzzwords instead of fact. We’re busy. Who has the time to try and decipher those ever-more-confusing nutritional labels and read the fine print on the ingredient list? It seems less and less of us do.

The study, How Food Marketing Creates a False Sense of Health, examined the degree to which consumers link marketing terms on food packaging with good health. It found that consumers tend to view food products labeled with health-related euphemisms as healthier than those without them. read more

prophylactic chocolate

2014-07-13 11.08.25.”
What can I say? I absolutely LOVE articles that tell me eating chocolate is a good thing AND healthy, too! Even better, these clever Swiss Scientists found that, “Fifty grams of dark chocolate a couple of hours before a stressful event may blunt the rise in stress hormones.”

If you knew me and my hermit-like existence, you’d know that this would mean I ate 50 grams of dark chocolate whenever I had to get behind the wheel of a motor vehicle, went shopping, or had to deal with pretty much any human. Life’s looking pretty good. 🙂 read more

impending vacation

supine Edwin X-ray

supine Edwin X-ray


We’re supposed to leave for our fall trip to Japan this coming Monday, September 15. I say this with some trepidation as the last vacation in March was cancelled the day we were to board a plane because of Edwin’s emergency surgery. That’s Edwin in the picture above with his completed bilateral subcutaneous ureteral bypass system. Our cats are our family so there was no question we were cancelling the trip. They bring a great deal of stress relief to the house, but this particular event was anything and everything but. To say that it tested our ability to cope would be an enormous understatement as Edwin really wasn’t in the clear (or as clear as any being living with these kinds of implants can be) until recently. That’s a long time to be under that level of stress. Not good for anyone. We’re stable at this point, but things could change at any time. Isn’t that the truth for all of us, though? read more

tweeking my biochemistry

Appointment with my fabulous functional medicine MD this morning to go over my NutrEval retest. Where are we after two years paleo + supplements? Much improved would be the answer, but I could have told you that! The interesting part, however, is that we now know my system well enough that we are able to use the data to tweek my biochemistry. I still have urticaria occasionally and itchiness caused by things like the Itraconazole I briefly used to kill Candida. Seems my methylation isn’t quite where it should be so I don’t have enough spare methyls to deactivate my histamine reaction to die-off caused by the Itraconazole. Hmm. We know I have a methylation defect so let’s add a bit more MTHF. I’m also low in glycine one of the components of glutathione (soucre of sulfate and plays a key role in antioxidant activity and detoxification). This is probably another reason I’m having trouble clearing my body of die-off debris. NutrEval still shows I’m a bit low in zinc and lipoic acid so there’s more of those in my future, too. I show some markers for bacteria and Candida, but I’m continuing on my SF722 and Allimed while waiting for the results of the GI Effects Microbial Ecology Profile – Stool I submitted on September 4th for all the details. This wll be back by the time I return from Japan. My blood chemistries are pristine, and my inflammatory markers have declined. Great new for someone with two auto-immune diseases!! read more

Wii balance experiment

My new red Wii + accessories

My new red Wii + accessories

An article crossed my virtual desk regarding Wii usage and balance in MS patients which led me to do some research. I quickly came across Wii Balance Board Induces Changes in the Brains of MS Patients and was further intrigued by the idea. Given I am always searching for more ways to push my progress forward in terms of regaining a more normal gate and balance after living with MS for 20+ years yet now recovering, I decided to obtain a Wii console and an accompanying balance board.

“The most important finding in this study is that a task-oriented and repetitive training aimed at managing a specific symptom is highly effective and induces brain plasticity,” he said. “More specifically, the improvements promoted by the Wii balance board can reduce the risk of accidental falls in patients with MS, thereby reducing the risk of fall-related comorbidities like trauma and fractures.” read more