Tecfidera

BG-12 (Tecfidera)
I keep track of what’s on the horizon as far as MS research is concerned. Given it takes many years for products to come to fruition with all the studies that need to be done in order to be considered for FDA approval, something that looks good in the beginning can fall flat somewhere along the route. BG-12, now known as Tecfidera, had my interest in its infancy as a drug.

I was so impressed with the data that it was the one drug I had even considered a substitute therapy—to finally leave Betaseron and the injections behind seemed a real possibility.

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breaking through mental blocks

I’ve been on a bit of a rampage of late. I discovered a mental block which was impeding my progress and encouraging me to put off several beneficial courses of action until we returned from our fall trip to Japan. I understand that sticking to my strict paleo diet is necessary, but I also know that there may be other pieces of the puzzle to find and incorporate.

Normally I’m trying to get everything done BEFORE we depart so I don’t have a stack of stuff waiting to be done when we return. Somehow I allowed myself to skate past that for several items namely beginning a physical therapy re-education program for my awakening nervous system, making/consuming bone broth on a regular basis, and trying a new med for my Candida problem. Thank you to Emma for unknowingly giving a nudge with her strength and motivation.

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information

I have this love/hate relationship with the news media. I love to stay informed, but one must define what “informed” is exactly. Is it informed or overwhelmed? There is a fine line, and my trigeminal neuralgia excels at pointing out the difference. I check different news sites—everything from the BBC, NY Times, CNN, and NHK. By far the most irritating or amusing, depending on your point of view, is CNN.

• How Pilates can help women with MS
• 11 ways to manage spine arthritis
• Solving the riddle of RA
• Tips for a sound sleep with MS
• 8 rheumatoid arthritis exercises
• The 123s of treating afib
• 8 ways to live better with RA

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methylation

VERY simply stated, methylation is a process that happens in all cells of the body so that you’re able to make the chemicals you need to function. It is tightly linked to folate metabolism and requires vitamin B12.

What exactly needs methylation reactions? The short list would include cellular repair, detoxification, neurotransmitter production, proper immune system function, and specifically important in my case, inactivating histamine. Those are some important functions, indeed.

MTHFR stands for methyl-tetrahydrofolate reductase which is the enzyme which is responsible for methylation; there are several genetic variants which result in suboptimal methylation. I have one copy of C677T gene for MTHFR.

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trigeminal neuralgia

December of 2012, I experienced trigeminal neuralgia–most likely related to MS. I distinctly remember that it is not what I told Santa I wanted for Christmas, but he was a shmuck that year, and that’s what I received. It started off cycling (about 20 minutes with pain, 20 minutes no pain), and I thought I could handle it if it continued to do that. It did not enter my mind how exactly I thought I was going to live as I was just trying to cope. It then stopped cycling. The trigeminal nerve has three main branches: opthalmic, mandibular, maxillary. Both the mandibular and maxillary branch were involved; it felt like I was having root canals on all the teeth on the right side of my face, both lower and upper jaws, without the benefit of a numbing agent.

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too much?

My parents always placed a premium on education. It was important and invaluable to know what was going on in the world and to educate yourself. I’ve always known what I wanted to do. It was never even a question.

I’ve been sick all of my life, constantly in hospitals, constantly sick with everything from pneumonia to allergic bronchitis to asthma. My lungs demand more than their quota of attention. I remember sitting on gurneys being pulled from a hospital room to the laboratory to have blood drawn. I loved the lab and its many sounds. The whirring, beeping, and alarms. How could they find the answers in my blood? What were they looking for? Yes, I wished they’d hurry up and find it, but I was absolutely enthralled. The healthcare workers humored me by telling me in simplified terms, of course, what they were doing. I wanted to be like them. I wanted to look for answers and find out “why” things happened or went awry. I wanted to feel better, too, but I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up.

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